about


prof

Day: January 30, 1990.
Place: Tokushima, Japan.

I don’t remember my mother. I grew up with an older brother and an abusive father, who liked to shoot me with an air gun, or beat me, sometimes until my teeth broke or head cracked open. He had a way with women too, not that it’s something I want to write about. I don’t want to talk about how he lives now with someone and their child. That reality sucks, and I wanted to get away. I was 19 when I took a trip to escape it.

It was my first time traveling abroad by myself. I went to Sapa, Vietnam, a mountainous region where minority groups live. From the city, it’s an overnight bus to another bus that drives into the mountains. I checked into a hotel that sits on the edge of a cliff, was shown a room, and I looked out the window at the view. I felt goose bumps stand up on my whole body, and I trembled. The world outside that window was so incredible I almost forgot what I was running from. I wanted to record it but didn’t have a camera. I started when I made up my mind then. I need to bring a camera when I travel.

When I was 20, I saw an exhibition of Takata Akira’s photography that impacted me more than any other I’ve seen since. Art ? I could feel it. From then on I got deep into photography, shooting to capture that feeling. Then I felt like trying to exhibit it.

Now I mostly do travel photography and skate photography. I take photos that steal the eyes of guards and cops. I shoot skaters who aren’t afraid of getting hurt at dangerous spots and don’t hold back. The moment the shutter clicks, I taste the best sense of accomplishment in the world.

But the exhibitions I do aren’t just in rooms. Currently I’m outside working on a project where I take stickers of a picture of a dead mouse and post them up all around. I’ve been thinking about ‘life’ and ‘death’ since childhood. And that picture is a reflection. It’s about how you might die tomorrow, even in a peaceful place like Japan. It’s about how in death, a human and a mouse are the same.

In 2015 I’m planning to put on a group exhibition with young squatters in London.


■Awards
2012 LONGINES-SAINT-IMIER PHOTO CONTEST Grand Prix
2014 SEKAI TABI SHASHINTEN One of final 10 persons
2016 APA awards 2016 Nyuusen

■Exhibitions
2012「KANPAI」@SLOWDOWN (Kyoto)
2014「9」@Delta Cafe (Shiga)
2014「B/W」@MEM (Tokyo)

■Group Exhibitions
2014「THIS PLACE IS OURS」@AIUSO (Ishikawa)


1990年1月30日
徳島県出身

物心がついたころには母親はおらず、幼少期を父と兄と過ごす。父は暴力が酷く、エアガンで撃たれたり、殴られて歯が折れることや頭を割られたことがある。女性関係もなかなかのものだったが、ここに書きたくはない。強いて言うなら、現在は彼女とその連れ子と生活をしている。

そんな現実が嫌で、逃げたかった。19歳の時に現実逃避の旅に出た。初めての1人での海外旅行。ベトナムのサパという山岳地帯に少数民族が住む地域に行った。ベトナムの中心街から、夜行列車に乗り、さらにバスを乗り継ぎ、山岳地帯に入ってゆく。サパに着いて、崖っぷちにあるホテルにチェックインを済ませ、部屋に案内され、その部屋の窓からの光景を見た。全身に鳥肌がたち、身体が震えた。自分の悩んでいることなんか忘れてしまうほどの素晴らしい光景だった。

この光景を自分の見たものとして、記録に残したいと思った。でも、その時はカメラを持っていなかった。そこで次の旅は必ずカメラを持って旅に出ようと決心した。ここから旅とカメラの生活が始まった。

20歳の頃に、TAKATA AKIRA氏の写真展に行った。今まで見たどの写真よりもインパクトがあり、芸術的だと感じた。そこからさらに写真に没頭し、自分もあんな写真を撮って、展示をしてみたいと思うようになった。

今は主に旅写真とスケートボート写真を撮っている。スケートボート写真は撮っていると「生きてる」と強く感じる。警察官や警備員の目を盗み撮影を行う。危険なスポットでも怪我を恐れず全力を尽くすライダー達。その瞬間が撮れた時は、この世の中で最高の達成感を味わえる。

室内の展示だけでなく、室外の展示にも力を入れている。現在行なっているのが、ネズミの死体の写真をステッカーにし、街に貼っている。このネズミの写真は、幼少期の体験から、常に「生死」を考える私をよく表していると思う。そして、平和な日本でも明日死ぬかもしれないと思い行動しなければならないということと、もし死ねばネズミも人も一緒だという意味を込めている。